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January 31, 2012

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momdocmidwives.com

I too am not comfortable with my doctor and am switching.

James Wong

I know I'm a little late but great post Paul regardless. That's why you're a great voice for our industry...we can always count on you to get the real scoop. I like your comment that we as vendors are evil. :)

NextGenCMO

Very moving Paul. Thank you for sharing. These are thoughts that so many people think (I hope) and don't speak. Our inner most fears, hopes and dreams. Applied to business. I am only very recently starting to "come out": showing more of my most personal self in my work life and visa versa. I credit social media for that: we are more accustomed and even encouraged now to show our true authentic selfs, warts and all. It feels good (and fosters true friendships and community in business). I am curious though about what you would like your epitaph to read if you don't mind me asking? Family man and loyal friend?

xem tu vi

Great post As someone who has a broad view of the industry and works to share its many voices with our readers, this is a great reminder of how important all of those constituents are.I see the bias toward practitioners and use cases sometimes backfire because both the presenter and the viewer cannot abstract the issues enough to really translate in a way that's useful. But that totally depends on the individual, as you say.

Maria Elena

Time flies so quickly that we barely notice it. But later on, we do notice the changes as we reflect on them. As businessmen, we strive to give our best in providing quality services or products to our customers taking into consideration the contextual environment.

As humans, we are innately good. We see to it that we live in accordance with accepted norms and go for what is moral. We are advocates of justice. But no matter how we work towards the good side, we cannot discount that there are some small lapses that needs to be corrected. We would then serve as a guiding hand in order to remove bias and uphold righteousness.

Ginger Conlon

Great post, Paul. As someone who has a broad view of the industry and works to share its many voices with our readers, this is a great reminder of how important all of those constituents are. Thanks.

A Facebook User

Hi Paul:

Life certainly goes by too quickly and only seems to speed up the older we get!

I recently turned 53 and also have the luxury of living a life dictated by what I believe is right and without regard to the implications of pissing the wrong people off.

I agree with your assessment that personal attacks have no place in debates and that most people are inherently good at their core. However, what this CRM ecosystem is entirely missing is open debate on detailed topics.

Debates at the level that provide actionable insights for technology purchasers just don’t happen that often. Vendors are afraid of questioning analysts, analysts rarely question other analysts and vendors (like politicians) want to stay on carefully crafted marketing scripts rather than getting into the weeds and debating detailed issues that have material value to purchasers. Yes, this may be one of those generalizations you referred to, but variances from this described pattern of behavior are few and far between.

Someday the Web will tear down this contrived and grossly inefficient ecosystem that could provide so much more value to technology purchasers and less to marketing that does not provide complete truths. I hope that I am alive to see it and will keep rocking the boat until I do!

Best, Chuck
CEO, FuzeDigital

Kelly Craft

Like Rachel, I'd like to offer up my thanks for this post.

As a beneficiary of your innate 'Do Good' outreach to assist others, I'm listening particularly closely. Especially as one who (too) frequently uses the terms 'practitioner' and 'in the trenches'. Solid gut-check on generalizations, and a reminder of how poorly it reflects on ourselves when we fall into that trap.

Always the voice of reason, Paul. I'm hoping this is widely read, and more significantly - truly absorbed by many in the community. Myself included.

Rachel Happe

Thanks for the post Paul. I've been a consultant, vendor, or an analyst my entire career (is that the perfect storm or what?!?) and I do find some of the biases toward one set of people or the other interesting because the truth is every constituent group in the market has a unique and valuable perspective *because* of where they sit. To innovate and solve problems you need as many perspectives on a problem as you can reasonably get.

One of the things that people really appreciate about my perspective is that I can both abstract issues so that others can see them from their context but I can also more quickly see root causes and basic assumptions that were never questioned which may be the fundamental cause of issues. The reason I can do that is because I sit outside of organizations but I am also familiar with many of them. At the end of the day, it allows me to frame the issues in a way that can more easily be shared. That has value. I see the bias toward practitioners and use cases sometimes backfire because both the presenter and the viewer cannot abstract the issues enough to really translate in a way that's useful. But that totally depends on the individual, as you say.

I very firmly believe that everyone of us will evaluate others based on our own bias and that it is not my job to convince the world that my perspective is necessarily more 'right' than another. Ultimately I will succeed or fail based on whether others see value in my perspective and so I try to tend my own garden... it doesn't work 100% of the time (I am competitive) but I think we would do well to think a little more about weeding.

Thanks for sharing.

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